Disclaimer
These guides do not in any way represent legal advice.
All guides are produced as a 'layperson' and 'informed friend'.
 
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What is the Decree Absolute?
 
 
 
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How Do I Get a Decree Absolute?

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Take a look at our Flowchart.

When the decree nisi is granted, 6 weeks and 1 day later the petitioner can apply for the final decree called the decree absolute and submit Form D36 (notice of application for decree nisi to be made absolute).

When the decree nisi is granted, 6 weeks and 1 day later the petitioner can apply for the final decree called the decree absolute and submit Form D36 (notice of application for decree nisi to be made absolute).

This is processed within a few days and the Court can then grant the decree absolute making the divorce final. The court will send to the petitioner and respondent Form D37 (decree absolute).

If the petitioner does not apply for a decree absolute, then the respondent can apply 3 months after the date the petitioner could have applied for the decree absolute. This is 4 months and 1 day after the decree nisi is granted.

The petitioner can prevent the respondent from doing this if the petitioner can show that by doing so would create financial difficulties, where a final financial order for ancillary has not been granted.